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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
&p said they need to do to keep the credit rating at triple-a. >> how big of a concern is that? even with the plans the credit rating might still be downgraded? >> it's a very big risk, anderson. there's two different events here and it's hard to keep them separated from each other. the first is getting the debt sealing lifted. that's the critical negotiation under way now. even if we get it lifted, eric's right. standard & poor's is saying even if you get it lifted it's how much you're willing to cut the deficits that they will really judge the triple-a rating of the united states on and if it's something less than $3 to $4 trillion in real cuts they're going to lower the credit rating of the united states for the first time in our history. we've had it since 1917 we've been triple-a. there's a growing sense at top levels here in washington that the chances of a credit rating downgrade is becoming more than just a possibility but moving towards a probability. >> april, for those who haven't been following this as closely as everybody in washington and a lot of other folks have been
them and this one will leave a big bite mark. >> is that a valid excuse? that maybe some staffer read it? >> i find that mind-boggling. such a statement would scream out to you as just incredibly wrong. that you cannot -- if you are a first-year student in high school and you read that statement, that's got to send up some alarms to you that says -- wait a minute. we can't sign this sort of thing. and particularly, not so much probably in the republican primary. if she does get into the general election, this sort of thing with independent voters just kills you dead. it's a nonstarter because it's such a fringe sort of way of thinking of things. >> it's also interesting that -- >> i would say that's probably why they didn't look at it. because i agree with you. had i read this and any of the republicans i talked to, they would say -- what the heck is this? i just think someone wasn't paying attention when they were doing their job. >> even in the explanation this group has put out, where retracted it, they did the classic -- this can be -- i'm sorry if you misconstrued this. they're n
save hundreds! yeah, that'll certainly stick with me. we'll take it. go, big money! i mean, go. it's your break, honey. same coverage, more savings. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> 15 days until the treasury says it will run out money. a tea party leader says don't raise the debt seeing and he says president obama is lying about the consequences if we don't. "keeping them honest" about what many republicans believe is central to solving the long-term problem. a constitutional amendment to balance the budget. they vote on "cup, cap and balance." cutting spending to 2004 levels and caps it and freezes it right there and calls for a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. >> all that we ask in this bill is that we simply allow the states to weigh in, should the federal government live under a balanced budget amendment. should they do that? >> i don't understand why people won't vote for the a balanced budget amendment because it's the only discipline that will ever force the politics of washington to meet the responsibilities of washington. >> let's do somethi
ceiling, pay its bills based on big-ticket items. that would be interest on the debt. social security, medicare and medicaid, defense spenders. more than $30 billion. unemployment insurance. what you'd get under the big-ticket scenario is a drawing off the line. that's your $172 billion. the government is out of money if you don't increase the debt ceiling. what gets cut? military pay. wouldn't get their checks under this scenario. veterans checks, irs refund. if you're waiting for one you wouldn't get it. nutrition services, foods stamps, wouldn't get paid. federal salaries, education department, other and you heard him mention foreign aid to the palestinians. you have to make the choices and cut it off right here. that's one way. suppose you decided instead we'll put a priority on the social safety net. under this scenario, interest gets paid, social security gets paid, medicare and medicaid and those nutrition services that got cut off last time, you could pay them. housing grants would go out. veterans affairs, unemployment, education and tuition assistance. but under this set of
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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